May 16, 2011

Updated Bell Curve: 'Why Are Black Women Rated Less Physically Attractive Than Other Women?'

We all know that there is racism and prejudice in the world. However, it is very disappointing when folks try to hide their racism and prejudice behind so-called science.

Satoshi Kanazawa is an evolutionary psychologist who decided that it wasn't enough to write a book on beautiful people and their daughters. He felt a need as an Asian man to share his bogus thoughts on the lack of physical beauty by our Nubian sisters in a recent Psychology Today article.

Kanazawa concludes that Black women are less physically attractive than other women because they are fat and have too much testosterone. I didn't make this up. He wrote,
"What accounts for the markedly lower average level of physical attractiveness among Black women? Black women are on average much heavier than nonblack women."
Black women have enough challenges ... it is terrible to see that folks are trying to denigrate them with poot-butt science. I look at my mom, my grandmothers, my sisters, my nieces, my former wives and my two beautiful daughters and my simple response to Mr. Kanazawa?


Phuque Your Science!


That's my opinion. What say u?

5 comments:

It's Very Dark Here... said...

WHY DOESNT HE FOCUS ON THE SCIENCE OF WHY ASIAN MEN HAVE SMALLER PENISES THAN NON ASIAN MEN? HOW ABOUT THAT SHIT. I AM SO TIRED OF HEARING ABOUT THIS DUMB ASS MAN.

Stan Szczesny said...

I haven't read it, but from everything I can gather, the PT article is unscientific. Coincidentally, I posted on race and beauty just this morning before seeing the PT article. There are a lot of interesting perceptions out there, past and present on the issue. Here's some of what I wrote:

I have noticed one use of the terms 'black' and 'white' in literature of which I'll give just two examples. The first is found in The Song of Solomon 1:5-6: "I am black, but comely...Look not upon me, because I am black, because the sun hath looked upon me: my mother's children were angry with me; they made me the keeper of the vineyards; but mine own vineyard have I not kept." Solomon's beloved apologizes for being black and says she is beautiful in spite of her skin color. The term 'black' seems here to be synonymous with 'ugly.' Granted, Solomon's beloved gained darker color because of working in the vineyards and not necessarily because of race, but the verse doesn't say "I am tan, but comely."

Before I give my second example, here are some of Webster's definitions of 'fair:'

"Fair: Clear; free from spots; free from a dark hue; white; as a fair skin; a fair complexion. Hence, Beautiful; handsome; properly having a handsome face, pleasing to the eye...just, equitable...not foul...honest, honorable, civil, liberal, free from stain or blemish..."

My second example comes from Romeo and Juliet. Romeo likens Juliet's beauty, when compared to other women, to "a snowy dove trooping with crows" and to "a rich jewel in an Ethiope's ear." It would seem, at least in the times of Shakespeare, King James, and Noah Webster, that the terms 'black' and 'white' meant 'ugly' and 'beautiful.' In the Shakespeare quote, an 'Ethiope' is the embodiment of 'ugly."

Feel free to read the rest of it at

http://stansgreatbooksblog.blogspot.com/2011/05/on-connotations-of-racial-terms-black.html

Dee-Vona said...

I would agree with Mr. Szczesny. The article is not based in any scientific fact or research. So, I don't understand why ''Psychology Today'' would publish such an article if there was no scholarly basis for it. If this is the case, then anyone should be able to publish anything. Me thinks PT is trying to deliberately cause controversy.

Dee-Vona said...

PT trying to cause controversy at the expense of black women. We have become everyone's punching bag it seems.

Villager said...

It's Very Dark Here and Dee-Vona - Methinks that he has been discredited. His article has been pulled from 'Psychology Today'. The power of online protest and online activism. Well done!

Stan - No doubt that the words 'Black' and 'white' have been given contrasting meaning over the year. We need to find ways to promote 'Black is beautiful' whenever possible!