December 17, 2012

Tim Scott Becomes First Black Senator From the South Since Reconstruction

I see that South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley chose Rep. Tim Scott to replace Jim DeMint in the Senate. The nation’s second Indian-American governor appointed the only African American who will be serving in the Senate come 2013.

I don't agree with Tea Party politics or politicians ... but, I have to admit that I ain't mad at either Nikki Haley or Tim Scott. The two of them made history today! Tim Scott is the first Black senator from the South since Reconstruction.

Scott burst onto the national scene in 2010, when he defeated Paul Thurmond in a runoff election for the Republican nomination in the state’s 1st Congressional District. When he won his seat in Congress that November, Scott made history, becoming the first black congressional Republican from the Deep South since Reconstruction.

I encourage all 'villagers' to give him the benefit of the doubt. Take a moment to learn more about Tim Scott.  From all I can see he will represent the citizens of South Carolina much better then Sen. Roland Burris represented the state of Illinois. Anyhow, I 'spose that he and Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL) are going to become good buddies, huh?!

5 comments:

Reggie said...

I live in South Carolina, I have for the past seven years.

I'm used to seeing Tim Scott on the ballot, but I've yet to vote for him. However, I don't mind saying that he's an improvement on Jim DeMint, but still Mr. Scott and I rarely see eye to eye politically.

I have a hard time even imagining myself voting for him.

Constructive Feedback said...

Electronic Villiage (and Reggie):

As we cast an eye upon the large swath of Elected officials who are favorable to you (both Black and White) - is there any process where you APPLY the twin brother of "The Benefit Of The Doubt" - which is "Where Is The Money That I Gave To You For The Last 50 Years, Based Upon Your CREDIT That You Had With Me"?

It seems strange to me that Tim Scott the "Republican Who Is Black" has received more scrutiny and skepticism from "Progressives who are Black" than the people who you all LIVE VICARIOUSLY THROUGH.

Might it be that the people that you favor are your voices to FIGHT "Tim Scott's Party" more than they STAND for the Development of the Black Community - regardless of the assailant to our cause?

Wayne Hicks said...

Reggie - Someone told me that Tim Scott will be much like Justice Clarence Thomas. That would be very disappointing to me. Keep us informed on how he's doing from the perspective of a South Carolina 'villager'.

Constructive Feedback - I don't expect either party to make the difference in the Black community. That will be up to us ... members of that community. That being said, there is *not* a single Republican party official or policy that I've seen related to people of color in America that is better than Democratic party officials or policies. President Barack Obama is a significant improvement for Black people in America then a 'President' Mitt Romney would have been. I guess what I'm saying can be summarized as follows:

Barack Obama won. Again. Get Over It. Again.

Constructive Feedback said...

Mr Hicks:

Your rationale is POPULAR among Black people but is also largely responsible for the failed "Community Salvation Through Voting" that we currently suffer.

WHY do you LOGICALLY stand up a REPUBLICAN to debate yourself again?

[quote]I've seen related to people of color in America that is better than Democratic party officials or policies.[/quote]
YOU merely told me that DEMOCRATS ARE more popular with Black people and thus JUSTIFIED the investment of THE VALUABLES that Black people have given to them with the hopes of "Community Salvation".

MY rebuttal: As we look within the Black community GOVERNING CONTROLS - is there any mechanism to HALT these contributions of "valuables", holding out for a better deal for BLACK PEOPLE - separate and distinct from your party membership and your will to have them beat the right wing enemy?

[quote]
President Barack Obama is a significant improvement for Black people in America then a 'President' Mitt Romney would have been.
[/quote]

Again you tell me about the AMERICAN POLITICAL DOMAIN. I guess I am supposed to affirm Mitt Romney.

INSTEAD my viewpoint is that NO OTHER FIGURE in American history has given THE BLACK INSTITUTIONS 'self-justified cover' in SELLING OUT the institutional integrity of the Black community under the guise of PROTECTION of a GOVERNMENT OFFICIAL from RACIST ATTACKS.

* Obama ran an international coup upon a sovereign African nation - but those of you who are "Reverse Dr Kings" argued that to fight against this attack would compromise your DOMESTIC SOCIAL JUSTICE.

* The present high Black unemployment rate should not be solely blamed on Obama. It represents 50 years of INVESTMENTS into a promised uplift - that today represents an unwillingness from Black people to demand: "Where is the money that I gave to you?"

AS BLACK PEOPLE - aren't we seeking to DEVELOP our people through COMMUNITY INSTITUTIONS?
If we focus on DEVELOPMENT rather than just POLITICS - Shouldn't the revised statement be:

1) Republicans are not an option because they are offensive to Black people in our present prevailing consciousness
2) We invested our valuables into the Democrat Party but despite them having monopoly control in places like Newark, Atlanta, Chicago - this still has not delivered the contentment that we as a people were seeking

3) NOW IS THE TIME to develop some APOLITICAL CHANNELS for the development of people that limits the constant OUTWARD STRUGGLE via the American political system but instead focuses upon governing the institutions that our people matriculate through.

Wayne Hicks said...

Constructive Feedback - I hope that other 'villagers' reading your comment will reply. Personally, I don't have any problem with the idea of people in the Black community creating apolitical organizations and strategies to improve the conditions (economic and social) in the Black community. I'm not certain that it has to be an either / or proposition. Can't we both support political organizations, people and ideas ... at the same time we support apolitical organizations, people and ideas.