November 29, 2008

Who Will Replace Julian Bond as NAACP Board Chair?


Villagers, we didn't talk about it earlier ... but, it is worth noting that Julian Bond, 68, will not seek reelection as NAACP National Board Chairman when his term ends in February 2009. Bro. Bond served in this post for 10 years.

"This is the time for renewal. We have dynamic new leadership. The country has a new President in Barack Obama; the organization has a new CEO in Benjamin Jealous, and we'll soon have a new Chairman of the NAACP Board. The NAACP and the country are in good hands," he added.

It strikes me that the NAACP has a critical decision when they elect their next national board chair. Will they elect another 'old school' person? Or will they take this opportunity to truly turn the NAACP over to the next generation of Black leaders?

The organization made a statement with the selection of Ben Jealous as the CEO. Will they sustain the momentum of becoming relevant in the 21st century with their selection of another young leader to backfill vacancy left by Bond's retirement?

I don't know all of the candidates ... but, I like what I'm hearing about Roslyn Brock, the current NAACP Board Vice-Chair. She seems to represent the NAACP of the future. She became the youngest person and first woman to hold serve as NAACP Board Vice-Chair. She is a magna cum laude graduate of Virginia Union University with a master's degree in health services administration from George Washington University, and a MBA from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University.

I hope that the NAACP won't miss this opportunity. It would be a shame for them to take a step backwards in time.

What are your thoughts? Do you sense that the NAACP will continue to be relevant to people of African descent in America?

7 comments:

Esquire said...

Unfortunately, I think its more about a return to relevance than continuing to be at this point.

Yet, I think it can be done fairly easily with the right people. While the organization has taken hits over the years, it never lost its name recognition and did not fall completely off the radar.

Bond is right. Now is definitely time for the NAACP to ride the wave of change back to new heights.

blackwomenblowthetrumpet.blogspot.com said...

Hello there!

I think that she will probably take the position that Julian Bond has held for ten years but just because she's YOUNG does not mean that she is bringing innovation and change to the N.A.A.C.P.! We will have to wait and see what she is saying about her philosophy for re-building the organization from the top to the bottom.

The N.A.A.C.P. at the local level has so many old church folks holding positions for years and years and they don't want to hand over the reigns to anyone. The problem with N.A.A.C.P. is that they stopped recruiting new blood and stopped promoting new blood. The people who had "seniority" were the ones who seemed to be in the most visible positions on important committees.

I am happy to see Julian Bond retire.

In the black community, the younger leadership NEVER steps up and steps in until our elders step aside...that's just how it is. This is what often happens in the black church as well.

It's time for the old guard to move on and move over because at SOME point, I feel that Jesse Sr. and Grandpa Al and Andrew Young need to realize that they are now standing in the WAY OF change rather than being at the forefront of change.

clnmike said...

Who ever it is should focus on shanging the direction of the organization that has become dated.

Aaron + Alaine said...

Black Women Blow the Trumpet is on point, but does not go far enough. Generational change in leadership at the NAACP board level and in local communities is a necessary step, but not sufficient. It must be accompanied by a signifigant increase in the quality of strategic leadership at national and local levels. At both levels, the simple organizational capability to run effective meetings, analyze problems, then develop and carry out a strategic, relevant response over time has been either lost or surrendered in pursuit of narrow political agendas or the retention of most favored gate keeper status. The Urban League is similarly afflicted. I have scant confidence that the change in leadership at the top will result in a complete rethinking of the NAACP's role, assets, strategy and goals. Visionary and paradigm shaking leadership is what is required. I will be utterly surprised if anything resembling that emerges from the NAACP's long overdue leadership change. The One has ascended to the Presidency. We can hope.

SjP said...

Change is inevitable and the young always step up to the plate when its their time. So, it is fitting that such occurs in the NAACP and the Urban League. But change does not mean turning a blind eye to the principals, mission, or ideals on which these organizations were established. It does, however, mean new tactics and strategies to accomplish these principals, mission and ideals. And it is this change for which I am hopeful for the NAACP.

Left you a little something at SjP’s

Villager said...

Esquire & Mike - My understanding is that the candidates for replacing Bond will represent the 'old' vs the 'new'. My hope is that the organization will follow on its courageous choice of Ben Jealous by electing a forward-looking leader as the NAACP Board Chair...

Lisa - I agree that Roslyn Brock will need to earn the position. However, I'm told that her main competitor is an old-school 65-year old preacher from the Detroit branch...

Aaron - With the recent ascension of Ben Jealous (NAACP CEO) and Barack Obama (POTUS) ... the timing is right for NAACP Board Chair to also be a forward-thinking leader that can help change the face and direction of the organization. There are some dynamic young leaders at branch level (K. Myles in Wichita or C. Smitherman in Cincinnati are examples). Perhaps it is time for all of us to give the organization a chance...

Villager said...

Sojourner - I agree with your comment entirely. Now, I'm off to see what you've left...