September 23, 2014

OURstory: Mary Church Terrell (1863-1954)

Black History is something that should be shared 24/7/365 ... not just in the month of February. We should glorify OURstory whenever we have the chance to do so.

Villagers, it turns out that a remarkable nubian woman was born on this day (September 23) in 1863. Her name was Mary Church Terrell and she lived for 90 years and had a remarkable influence for African Americans ... particularly women.

You can click here to read her full bio. Here are some excerpts that I found uplifting:
She was a popular speaker and lecturer and wrote many articles denouncing segregation. Her appointment to the District of Columbia Board of Education in 1895 was a first in America for a woman of color. She resigned in 1901, was reappointed in 1906, and held the post until 1911. In 1909, she was one of two Black women (Ida B. Wells-Barnett was the other) invited to sign the "Call" and be present at the organizational meeting of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, thus becoming a charter member of the national organization. She assisted in the formation of the Delta Sigma Theta Sorority at Howard University in 1914, accepted honorary membership, and wrote the Delta Creed, which outlined a code of conduct for young women.

Mary Church Terrell was involved in the international women's movement on three occasions. She represented Black women on the American delegation to the International Congress of Women at Berlin in 1904 and was the only women to deliver her address in English, German, and French. Her theme was equal rights for women and people of African descent wherever they may be found. In 1919, she received international recognition as a speaker on the program at the Quinquennial International Peace Conference in Zurich, and in 1937 she delivered an address before the International Assembly of the World Fellowship of Faith in London. In 1940, she wrote her autobiography, A Colored Woman In A White World.
This is an example of a powerful African American who may not be known well enough in our community. Villagers, did you know of this sister before today?

10 comments:

Rosemarie said...

I didn't, and it's a shame. I'm wondering how many youngsters today are learning about her.

Villager said...

Rosemarie - I hope to share information more frequently in the future about Black History. Thank you for your continued support of the Electronic Village

Sheletha said...

I remember hearing about her and all her accomplishments at Howard University...yeah, she was the bomb

Fish said...

Yep. There is a cool site that I check out each day that provides daily black history info on icons and events. It's called www.DayInBlackHistory.com. It's actually one of the prettiest sites I've seen. Enough talking, anyhow the story on her is at: http://www.dayinblackhistory.com/showarticle2592.aspx

peace.

Villager said...

Sheletha - My sister is a Howard alum as well, however, I was still ignorant of Sis. Terrell today.

Fish - Good lookin' out. Thanx for the reference to the Black History website.

plez... said...

Villager,
thanks for the education... i had not heard of Mary Church Terrell before reading your post. my wife is a Delta and doubt that she's even heard of her! this was an amazing read! THANKS again!

Villager said...

Plez - Your comment made my day. I appreciate your frequent visits to our village...

DNLee said...

I knew about her. Her family is from Memphis (my hometown) and her father was Robert Curch, and to the best of my knowledge he was the first Black Millionaire in the US.

nack josef said...

It does take a village but on this issue I feel it's going to take specifically a black village engaging all members of the black village.
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Villager said...

Danielle - I didn't know her pops was the first Black millionaire in the nation. Oddly, I thought that honor was held by a Black woman. You learn something new every day!

Nack Josef - I can't tell if you're a real person or a spider just leaving a link ... but, in either case, thanx for taking the time to share your comment with us.