November 7, 2007

Enhancing Education Through Technology

Villagers, the House of Representatives and the Senate are scheduled to take up the final version of the FY08 Labor, HHS and Education Appropriations bill, which contains $272 million for Enhancing Education Through Technology (EETT) program the week of November 5. Please email your Senators and Representatives immediately and urge them to support passage of the FY08 Labor, HHS and Education spending bill.


Click Here to enter your zip code and send a letter with this important message.


You need to know that President Bush vowed to veto the final version of the Labor, HHS and Education spending bill because it exceeds his budget proposals by nearly $11 billion, putting EETT funding into jeopardy. The House and Senate need to pass this bill by a two-thirds majority in order to show the President that Congress will override his threatened veto – so every vote counts!

Please make your voice heard and write your congressional representative asking for his/her support of the Labor-HHS and Education bill. Let Congress know the deep impact this funding has on the day-to-day lives of our nation’s students and teachers.

13 comments:

Woozie said...

Being fortunate enough to have technology at my fingertips at school, it certainly does make things much, much easier.

Villager said...

Woozie - You are absolutely correct. My 14-year old daughter is required to purchase a laptop for use at her school in Detroit. They use the laptop every day in the various classrooms, as well as for her homework assignments. We live in a new world ... and our children need to have the ability, training and support to travel in this new world.

That Girl Boo said...

Hi Villager, sorry I haven't been home for a while but it's always nice to hear the village drums playing.
This whole education issue is turning into an "African" American nightmare.
We recently posted an article in the Houston Chron about the drop out rates in Houston at some high schools (all black and Hispanic schools of course)and the drop out rates were none other then 40%. The story Referred to them as "Drop Out Factories". Just Sick.
Sometimes I don't understand how we can relay on an oppressor to properly educate us. It's Wild

Villager said...

Boo - Do you recall when our parents were so focused on education being the all-important goal. They realized that an oppressive system could never take away the knowledge and ability to think that education brings with it. Somehow, we have lost that feeling in our community ... to the point that it is considered that you are "acting white" if you are proud to get good grades and such. Remarkable how chains can be kept on our minds without even having to see them on our legs or wrists...

Woozie said...

My brother (he's 31) is always astounded at all the stuff we have access to and the classes like Computer Programing for example. He went to D.C. Public Schools back in the 80s, and all this stuff was practically unheard of. Amazing, really.

Shelia said...

Thanks for the reminder villager. We all definitely should make an effort on this one. My daughter and son have definitely benefited from the blessing of having technology at home and readily available at school. It makes a difference.

That Girl Boo said...

Yes Village, I can remember that time, what a mind game thats being played on our children, and who started this farce directly aimed at our children? because the white kids know thats bogus.

One of the major reasons why they fought so hard is for the opportunity to receive an equal education. Well we won according to us, but let me ask you, doesn't it seem like the schools are still separate and hella unequal?

I wish that the Jack & Jill groups would take more responsibility and help create more of these schools rather then leaving the middle to poorer class black children to drown in this confusion.

Yobachi said...

Please check and respond to the “Opportunity For Black Bloggers” post at the Afrospear google group. I need some immediate response and thought I might reach you here quicker than you may have checked the group.

Villager said...

Yobachi - I have been offline dealing with a recent homegoing in my family. I am in catch-up mode now. I will take a look at your Black Blogger Opportunity message shortly.

Villager said...

Boo - Jack and Jill groups are one place that we can look to for assistance. However, the greatest assistance needs to come from within. We need to have parents that establish an environment for learning and high expectations at home in order for our children to succeed at school.

Villager said...

Shelia - Every Black family needs (a) a computer at home; (b) internet connection for that computer and (c) training on how to use that computer.

Gerri said...

That there sounds like a very good idea and something that will help a lot. My wish is for African nations to adopt such practises to enhance education. Rwanda is an example where something like this has kind of started with their one laptop per child project. More nations should follow suite as it is a win win situation as far as I see it. My heart will always be in Africa.

Villager said...

Gerri - I would love to learn more about ways that African American information technology professionals can hook up with our counterparts in Alkebulan.